“VANI” (Voice) Magazine from Medical Students Association of INDIA Calls for Articles Internationally this year!

Greetings from Medical Students Association of India!

MSAI-India, the nation’s first and largest medical students organisation caters to a country of 1.2 billion people. Every year, we publish our official magazine, MSAI Vani. “Vani”, a Sanskrit term, literally translates to “voice”; and to justify its name, the magazine has helped medical students from across the nation voice their opinions and thoughts to the community.

This year, we encourage our peers from across the globe to come and participate in this noble initiative. Submissions can be in the form of articles, photographs or artwork. The links for submissions are given below. Submissions must be in accordance with any of our themes, as follows:

  1. Medicine Around the World (Special International Segment)
  2. ​Caution! Minds At Work
  3. A Change of Palate
  4. Tales of Crumbling Concrete

About the Special International Theme
As curious minds, we’d like to know how medicine is–in the past, present, and future–in your country! Do tell us about what it expresses, what it is unique for, what it lacks, and what it is proud of! As the world comes closer to become a global village, join us in this initiative to bring the best of healthcare for one and all!

To know more about the themes, read: https://goo.gl/AJKQhn

Submissions should be sent to publications.ifmsapakistan@gmail.com by 18th February 2018

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Veterans- Learn, to love thyself!

No joke – med life is hard.
And any Muggle would be very tempted to ask “why choose it and put your life in more distress than is humanely handle-able?”

Well, for some of us, this is simply a matter of parental choice that breaks no arguments. But for those (like me) who chose the constant adrenaline rush, there’s an unimaginable thrill in saving a life.
Medicine is no easy profession, it’s the hardest of them all. But there is no holier job to do than to save a life. Each day, to let fresh breath to a man dying of suffocation, to give a heartbeat to someone who flat-lined, to hear a newborn cry in it’s mother’s arms, gives intoxicating happiness; it is our rejoice.

As a matter of fact however, I haven’t yet saved a single life. For two years, I haven’t made a House M.D. diagnosis on a proper live patient or performed some miraculous life-saving emergency Code Black procedure. Honestly, I have just memorized the courses and extents of more nerves and blood vessels than I can count and learnt hundreds of physiological and pathological phenomenon, but I haven’t yet used them anywhere- all to no avail. And I am sure it’s the same for almost all second year medical students.

So sometimes, it starts to get frustrating when it feels useless and pretty stupid to study all these books, memorize thousands of terms, spend countless hours learning the anatomy of abdomen without seeing the chance of putting a scalpel on one any time soon, to know exactly what gait a person with cerebellar ataxia would have but not having one such patient walk into my fantasy clinic.

To me, the biggest anguish of a second year medical student lies in not being given the chance to be the angel that wards off death, considered skillful enough to use the magical healing powers in his hand, and deemed competent enough to at least be allowed to call himself a doctor- the chosen one.

In these times, I ask myself, “All this for passing these never-ending exams?” And there’s this voice that resonates in the cranial cavity in response: “For more to come, for the thrill of it”. And there is no greater satisfaction than in knowing the meaning of these nine words for they hold so much depth that I can’t possible explain however-much I widen their breadth. But to give you a path to make the anguish easier on you, I shall try for your sake.

Imagine reading a fantasy novel, giving in to it, and letting it take you into a parallel universe where you are the characters of that book and you can “feel what they feel”. Very similarly, if you read a medical textbook like it’s the story of you, you will enter an alternate dimension deep within your soul. A new aura of learning surrounds you, engulfs you. Your reading of the book is no longer a daydream, it is knowledge of self.

When reading a medical textbook, you are exploring the human body – God’s most complex creation – and making friends with yourself. You make friends with new anatomies. You make friends with the beauties you see under the microscope. You know that it’s not just some patient you are going to see years later; it’s you, here and now. You can almost glimpse the soul of the person who’s body you are doing some spotting or dissection on. You familiarize yourself with your liver, you get to know what your hepatocytes look like, what they do. You learn how your body moves, how you talk, how you think all this genius stuff. And the best part is that you know that you are not just making new concepts, that its not just clustered words out of a textbook in your head, its beautiful new synaptic connections and neural pathways, its birth to new chemicals. You can see the marvel of this creation and you can see in yourself every fragment of it. And when this happens, you feel this sense of belonging, as a wave of serotonin washes over you.

Medicine is not all about curing dying people. Sometimes, it has to be about looking into a mirror and learning what no piece of glass or criticism could ever teach you. Sometimes it is a way to your salvation. Sometimes it is the beginning of a new you, the learned you who knows itself. Sometimes the prospect of doing what you are best at and excited for must wait for the sake of learning mankind’s ultimate lesson: patience. And sometimes for becoming the excellent you must first learn what is waiting out there for us all to be learnt- humility.

Written by: Khair ul Barayya

Assistant Director and Editor Publications support division director


We as medical students go through a lot, A LOT of stuff. Veterans is an initiative, taken by IFMSA Pakistan Publications support division, to make all the medical students realize that they are not alone and to share experiences that may help someone. If you think your experience can help someone, don’t wait a second, pen it down and send it to us on Publications.ifmsapakistan@gmail.com because every one of us is worthy of being helped and almost of all of us need it at sometime. Share before it’s too late for someone.

Veterans: PROFs will end like every other rainy season

We as medical students go through a lot, A LOT of stuff. Veterans is an initiative, taken by IFMSA Pakistan Publications support division, to make all the medical students realize that they are not alone and to share experiences that may help someone. If you think your experience can help someone, don’t wait a second, pen it down and send it to us on Publications.ifmsapakistan@gmail.com because every one of us is worthy of being helped and almost of all of us need it at sometime. Share before it’s too late for someone.


‘Life is beautiful!’ something which a med student never says but yeah it is. I
totally agree the never-ending stress of this field can make us indifferent to the
beautiful world around us but there’s a solution to every problem like there’s a
medicine for every ailment. I know my solution won’t help you but it might
give you some perspective. Life is a rollercoaster, it is exciting and fearful at
the same time but you would want to do it all again once the rollercoaster
stops.
Let’s talk about profs (just the thought of it gives u jitters doesn’t it!) If
someone would put prof synonymous to extreme stress in a dictionary then I
wouldn’t disagree. We might know where the two hundred and six bones in
our body are and what a neuron comprises of! but to deal with stress is
something we are not good at. My personal experience may shed some light
on this matter. My 1 st prof, I couldn’t sleep at night totally lost, consumed by stress. I coped with never ending fear of failure through the warm and mellow words of
various books and articles which I used to read. The thing I realized after
reading one was that they take you to an alternate world where you become
part of what you are reading and every other thing including stress vanishes,
which brings a change to your thoughts and all that you feel is a relaxed state
of mind. You are introduced to the new world, you get to meet other people,
you get to know them and most importantly you get to feel what they are
feeling which takes all your worries away. Reading is a metaphor for all the
things that make you smile, laugh and even cry sometimes!

I am not saying neglect your studies…Work hard; harder than you ever have but don’t lose hope. Don’t fall into the dark pit of depression. You are precious. Make sure to channelize your stress into something positive that will make you a better, stronger and more efficient person. Take a break, do something you love and chop chop, back to work again. Give yourself a little credit, you have made it this far. I just want to say don’t beat yourself up, it’s only an exam and you’ll have to face many more in the coming year, you might not succeed in all of them but that won’t define you, they never do! Just take a deep breath and for once do something that makes you happy. In the words of Bruce Wayne, “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall”.

Written by: Abdul Mateen

Assistant Director Publications Support Division